DOH cites role of adults in preventing the use of deadly firecrackers among children PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 15 December 2014 11:40

By LEILANI S.JUNIO

 

With the 2014 year-end revelry barely two weeks away, the Department of Health (DOH) has cited the important role that parents and adult family members play when it comes to the prevention of children from using deadly firecrackers and other dangerous noisemakers which can cause severe destruction to lives, properties and even the future of the children themselves.

“The role of adults in this aspect is very important. In the first place, it is them (parents) who should set good examples as they have more authoritative power over their children,” said DOH spokesperson Dr. Lyndon Lee-Suy during the launching of the 2014 “Iwas Paputok” campaign of the DOH last Dec. 11.

Dr. Lee-Suy said that adults can help a lot if they themselves will not be seen by children using firecrackers because older people usually have a big influence in shaping the behavior and attitude of the young.

He stressed that adults or parents should realize the impact of using the deadly firecrackers that can cause wounds, serious injuries and even deaths.

He noted that among these injuries can be in the eyes, hands or other parts of the body that can be hit by strong explosion of firecrackers.

“The injuries are sometimes very fatal to the point that such can diminish or limit the productivity of the children when they grow up, especially if they sustain serious injuries that will require amputation,” the DOH spokesperson said.

The DOH’s “Iwas Paputok” campaign for this year has the theme “Mahalaga ang Buhay, Iwasan ang Paputok” (Life is Precious, Avoid Firecrackers).

According to Dr. Lee-Suy, it is very vital that those who sustain injuries immediately wash the wounds as there are cases that even small wounds caused by explosion of firecrackers become severe due to the incorrect handling of the injury, not seeking medical treatment right away or failure to receive the recommended administration of anti-tetanus vaccine.

Moreover, he cited that inhaling of fumes of firecrackers can also cause irritation to those people suffering from respiratory or lung problems like those with asthma and other chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The DOH official also said that aside from causing injuries and sometimes death, firecracker explosions also sometimes cause accidental fires.

Dr. Lee-Suy advised that in order to protect life, the best thing to do is to stay away from the use of firecrackers and support the DOH’s “Iwas Paputok” campaign during the coming Christmas and New Year celebrations.

He said that adults can begin discouraging the use of firecrackers during holiday celebrations through more meaningful and colorful alternative ways.

“It can be celebrated through street parties, singing in videoke, concert, honking of car horns, using ‘torotot’ (party horn) or other musical instruments that produce other sounds of noise like xylophone, maracas, drum, trumpets, cymbals and others,” he added.