Declaration of ‘war’ PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 01 July 2015 10:53

BEHIND  THE  LINES

BY BOB JALDON

San Jose, CA. — The awkwardly-termed “suspicious manifesto.” That’s all it took to stir the deadly bees. Now,I understand that there are two manifestos — one allegedly emanating from City Hall’s Barangay Affairs Office, the other from the urban poor’s. Those were cheap shots at trying to split Mayor Ma. Isabel G. Climaco-Salazar and Cong. Celso L. Lobregat. The mayor, as expected, denied having a hand in this chicken-hearted, white-feathered deed that’s obviously meant to stop Mr. Lobregat’s re-entry into City Hall and extend Mrs. Climaco-Salazar’s dominion over Zamboanga city.

About this time last year, I said that Mrs. Climaco-Salazar will run for re-election. Her handlers will make sure that that’s going to happen. Mr. Lobregat, as he asserted in several political gatherings, will try to return to City Hall. This scenario is imminent. Quoting Charles V of Spain, Sir Francis Bacon wrote: “Fortune hath somewhat the nature of a woman, that if she be too much woed, she is the farther off.” In Mrs. Climaco-Salazar’s case, such is the opposite.

A friend who lives in the suburbs of Metro-Manila who sometimes acts as a chiromancer, reckons that this Salazar-Lobregat scuffle resulting from these twin manifestos will escalate into a political uproar. If there is a breach of contract between the two political titans, it should be fixed, pronto, in the presence of those who stood as witnesses to the verbal pact made six months before the 2013 election at La Vista del Mar. That deal proved to be a misfortune for my friend, the honorable Erbie Fabian, for he was thumped on the assumption that a formidable politician from the north was running for mayor. The penal code stopped that scenario from happening.

Mr. Fabian wasn’t ready to bow out from politics without a good, clean fight. Two the Pres. Aquino’s close advisers tried to convince him to give way to Mrs. Climaco-Salazar in exchange for a high position in the government, a foreign posting or as assistant DILG secretary. He simply didn’t want to lose the “white toga” just because he was asked to. His running for mayor then was all about pride and guts and love for Zamboanga.

Was Mr. Lobregat shocked by the manifestos? Is he feeling threatened by the strength of a woman. Did he not see such shoddy design coming? Since silence isn’t his best repartee, he dared to investigate where those white papers originated, as was only right for him to do so. This act, if he regains City Hall in 2016, will not go unpunished. I know him. He should send his operatives, known during the war as fifth-columnists, to find out who engineered this intrigue.

As for Mrs. Climaco-Salazar, she should be straight-forward and state her plans for next year’s election. Absent that, Mr. Lobregat shouldn’t be in a panic mode just yet. But it’s good to be prepared for Red October. As for the voters, they can choose between “build back better” or “the best has yet to come.” Rise now and speak your preference. Both are fighting for peace. We’re safe with either of them as far as the Bangsamoro region issue is concerned. Both appear to be greatly involved in trying to fix the power and water crises. Both are patriots, honest, well-bred, highly-educated and paved with good resolutions. The only difference is gender. And may ask them if they agree to same-sex marriage and divorce in the Philippines?

As mentioned, nothing is certain until Red October when their colors are shown and their rehashed platform of government yet again unveiled. Then, there’s the matter of who to support for president.

Dios ya lang cuidao.