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Monday, 25 April 2016 11:33

BEHIND  THE  LINES

BY BOB JALDON

Los Angeles, CA. — Writing for TIME, Joel Stein said: “Being a satirist is an enormous responsibility. First, you have to know the difference between satire, parody or irony. You also have to spend time trying to prove that you attack liberals just as much as conservatives even though you know you really don’t. Also, you have to make sure people don’t miss your sarcasm, lest they think you mean the opposite of what you did. Though you might be an ironist.”

In Zamboanga, we’ve had one of the best satire writers who tragically died in the 80s and on Innocence Day, to be precise — Porfirio Doctor. To him, it was a pursuit to gain attention of his target audience — the people with questionable immigration status. He ran a humor newspaper that was published whenever he felt like rolling the presses. No writer approximates his satiric poetry.

Eddie Dolores was his counterpart on radio. The Bureau of Customs and the Bureau of Internal Revenue were never spared from his tirades. These government offices, even now, were the most maligned agencies in Planet Zamboanga.

I read Doctor and listened to Dolores when I was still a student in college incessantly hitting their targets using only their mighty pen and microphone.

It looks like politicians have seemingly taken their places. The only thing that is maybe bothering these politician-satirists is the non-response of Mayor Climaco-Salazar. Are they trying to shoot down a Baby Imelda? Not even close because she isn’t a fashionista.

Yes, the mayor has been getting a bad press and bad reviews lately, plus ridicule and malice, in a manner that she’s not used to. Well, that’s the price she’ll have to pay for being Citizen One in Zamboanga where freedom of the speech and of the press is very much alive.

Satire, it is said, “brings attention in the all-entertainment-all-the-time world we live in to people who otherwise wouldn’t see it.” Satire also “is the opiate of the masses.” Those trying to appear like Donald Trump, the Accuser, have apparently not done much to destroy the image of the mayor with their eviscerating comments and rude speeches.

But there are politicians that should be admired for their humility and nobility. I have chosen eight of the senatoriables that deserve to be elected:

1. Roman Romulo - three-time congressman of Pasig city. He is the author of the “Iskolar ng Bayan” law. He is the son of former budget and foreign affairs Sec. Alberto Romulo;

2. Lilia de Lima - former justice secretary under Pres. Aquino. She was one of the most effective, high-achieving members of the Aquino cabinet. She is described as uncompromising and no-nonsense;

3. Francis Pangilinan - former senator and former co-secretary of the Department of Agriculture under PNoy. He also handled the National Food Authority;

4. Serge Osmena - a maverick incumbent senator with an independent voice in the senate;

5. Ralph Recto - incumbent senator who has authored a number of key revenue bills;

6. Richard “Dick” Gordon - a good friend of our very own, Eddie and Deli Buendia, he is the national chairman of the Philippine Red Cross. He was one the first responders when a fire broke out in the interior of Camino Nuevo that left hundreds of poor people homeless. He was a former senator and former mayor of Olongapo city. He transformed Subic into a successful economic zone and free port.

7. Sen. Teofisto “TG” Guingona III - he is the chairman of the powerful and influential Senate Blue Ribbon Committee.

8. Miguel “Migz” Zubiri — He is the author of the Renewable Energy Law. Like Digong, he is from Mindanao.

No. I won’t divulge my candidates for the council in District I.