In the company of influential personalities PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 17 August 2016 14:47

Sound Snipes

BY Jimmy Cabato

Starting out late in writing again. Didn’t want today’s council session for the life of me, as scheduled folr discussion was the fate of Ismael Musa, IPR to the city council. And it happened, Musa was able to secure a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO).

At first, the TRO seemed not to have mattered at all. Member Kim Elago of the yellow team - a lawyer at that - was, to this corner, brazenly disregarding the TRO, arguing that only Vice Mayor Iturralde was covered by the court order. That the council members are not.

True, the councilors were not included in Musa’s petition, but he may missed out on one point, the judiciary that interprets the law, is a co-equal and independent body to that of the legislative body.

Friends, the TRO was specific - pending litigation of the Musa petition, recognize petitioner Musa for a period of less but not more that 20 days.

To WS, lawfully, the TRO prevails. And to any literate individual, the TRO was specific. Recognize IPR Musa, it said so in so many words. That was the message. A TRO is an action of a competent court — a mandate. It must be respected, never bended.

So as it did. Musa was recognized.

In his deliberations, Elago simply managed to only wastefully prolong the session, yet in the end, give up just the same.

Similarly, some of his yellow team colleagues also seemed to be eying one other thing as they appeared to ready to swallow, even if shallow, his points hook, line and sinker.

Only one possible reason. With re-entry of Councilor Teodyver Arquiza and the ouster of Musa, snatch the council majority bloc.

What “ers’? (Else)

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Two things. One, it pays to be influential and in the company of even greater influential personalities.

Second, a statement of a Talon Talon Kag. Victorino Iballo relative, is markedly revealing.

On the first. Just wondering. Does the act of persons making selves out of sight for some nine days after arrest warrants with no bail recommended are issued against them, constitute flight from the law?

Logically, it does. But how the law deals with that is beyond me. If it does (this is purely a supposition, friends), then it follows that being influential and in the company of even greater influential personalities, could only be seen as to have paid off in the case of Coun Teodyver Arquiza, and Kag. Iballo. In their absence, and through their lawyers, they were granted bail.

However, it was reported Atty. Quirino Esguerra, legal counsel of Councilor Arquiza and Liong legal counsel of Ibalio invoked the latest Supreme Court jurisprudence supporting the grant of bail for malversation cases on “People of the Philippines Vs. Luzviminda S. Valdez”, which moved the presiding judges.

No mention, however, was made on the issue of flight risk.

But good for them. Moneyed, as they seem having easily paid over half a million pesos — or are loaded with money-contributing friends as claimed — they could have helped co-accused former Talon Talon treasurer Emie Eijansantos raise money to bail her out, too.

The poor preggie is now detained. Poor soul, to think as treasurer her signature is only ministerial. It is not, she  who spends the money.

On the next  point, that the statement of a Kag. Iballo relative, is markedly revealing, you will know who spends.

According to a ZT report, a relative said Ibalio, being the Committee on Appropriations chairman, signed the papers thinking the money will be used for the intended purpose which was diverted to another project.

Bingo! Both Ibalio and Eijansantos do not have a hand as to where the money goes.

As to who has the polwer, we will just quote a TV info footage that says - O, ha. Now you know!

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In indignation, writer Rigoberto Tiglao shares some vey interesting bits on the Marcos burial at the heroes cemetery, as he joins the debate, which was motivated by his recent discovery. That is, during the time of President Corazon Aquino, she ordered the burial, with military honors, of her dog at Malacañang Park, while she doggedly refused to allow Marcos’ interment at the Libingan.

In detail, he wrote, “On Facebook, someone has posted an old Reuters story on the controversy generated by the dog’s interment. The dog’s name was Shadow, and it was a Labrador bitch, and she served as security for President Cory for six years.

The canine devotion is self-pitying, but what appalls and offends is the imposture of the Aquino crowd that there is a legitimate question about whether President Marcos is qualified to be interred at the Libingan.

The fact is, Marcos is qualified many times over for interment there, and with all the honors that he deserves because he is:

1. a Medal of Valor awardee;

2. a former President of the Republic, and incidentally, the only reelected President in the country’s history;

3. a former secretary of national defense; and

4. a veteran of World War II”

He went, on, the case for a Marcos burial at Libingan has been advocated by many, but no one has presented it more forcefully and convincingly than retired Brig. Gen. Rosalino A. Alquiza, who wrote to Star columnist Federico Pascual on the matter, and who then quoted the letter in a column published on April 24, 2011.

Alquiza cited “AFP Regulations G 161-373, subject: ‘Allocation of Cemetery Plots at the LNMB,’ issued on 9 April 1986 by GHQ AFP under then AFP Chief of Staff Gen. Fidel V. Ramos and then President Corazon C. Aquino, prescribes who are entitled to be interred in the LNMB.

“Pursuant to the aforecited AFP Regulations, re-published on 11 Sept 2000 as AFP Regulations G 161-375, there are 10 categories of deceased persons entitled to be buried at the LNMB. Truth is, all 10 were, but here we simply say that Marcos was describe qualified in all categories.

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Pencils up. Pass your paper. Till tomorrow. God bless