Parking, etc. PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 02 August 2017 11:47

BEHIND  THE  LINES

BY BOB JALDON

Local police can’t simply implement our traffic laws because there’s just too many vehicles of all makes and brands illegally parked everywhere. While motorists in the United States spend an average of 17 hours a year searching for parking spots on streets, in lots and parking garages, police spend 24 hours chasing down traffic violators for tickets. The hunt for parking translates to $345 per driver in wasted time, fuel and emissions.

Overpaying, a report said, caused by drivers’ inability to estimate how long they need to park or forking over extra to avoid the risk of getting a parking ticket, costs Americans more than $20 billion a year or $97 per driver. How much do car owners in Manila spend annually for parking and parking tickets? How much do local car owners spend for street parking?

Zamboanga, where hundreds of motorcycles, tricycles, jeepneys and automobiles of all sizes, has become a huge parking lot. “No parking” signs are arrogantly ignored by motorists rendering those traffic signs in red paint useless. Nothing, since the time those signs where staked, has been done to collar erring drivers.

Alas, the city traffic lights have been proven impractical — at least at the Mayor Jaldon-Buenavista intersection. The flow of traffic is better without those expensive traffic lights. Motorists don’t have to sweat it out while waiting for their turn to pass. That’s a point for Mrs. Apple Go.

The old waterfront market? It is what it is supposed to be: filthy, smelly and despicable. While the north side of the market is a little bit clean, the south end of it where the old Venancio Saavedra building stands, is a living hell. Food sold there is ricked with bug-carrying diseases like flies and roaches. The city needs to hire more sweepers and health/sanitation officers to rid that part of the market of filth.

This has become an environmental concern that must be addressed by Mrs. Go, pronto. It is urged that the religious leaders vocal about the foul mouth of El Presidente, extra-judicial killings, violations of human rights and earth’s meltdown should involve themselves in the cleanliness of the market(s) where they get their food supplies from. We are all in this together: peace and order, preservation of democracy, climate change and sanitation.

Incidentally, I’d love to see where my honorable congressman stands in the revitalized Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL) that was handed over to El Presidente by the representatives of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), the armed organization that is claiming to be the voice of the Bangsamoro. To my understanding, the unconstitutional provisions that where watered down by the previous congress have been reinstated in the comprehensive agreement package. Those unconstitutional propositions where pointed out by Mr. Celso L. Lobregat and concurred by the majority of congressmen and senators during the ebbing months of the last congress.

The Third Party Monitoring Team has observed that the burgeoning ideology of the Islamic State (ISIS), frustration with governance of both the government and the MILF, and the promise of ample financial support have been luring young recruits

The TPMT said the failure to pass the BBL by the previous administration deepened frustrations among the (Muslim) people and more youth became attracted to violent extremism leading to the rise of terrorist groups like Maute. It added that failure (this time) to pass this important legislation could mean worse for the peace process and the clearly volatile situation in Mindanao.

While crying for peace, the MILF fighters have not laid down their weapons, as one of the conditions for the passage of the BBL. Some of their inferior guns were decommissioned during a ceremonial handshake. That was it.

Let’s see what happens when the debate on the BBL commences in the House and the senate.